Press Releases

Art as Inspiration at Capitol Crossing

10/06/21 – Property Group Partners (PGP) is partnering with The William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation to bring an art installation to 200 and 250 Massachusetts Avenue at Capitol Crossing in Washington, D.C. Displayed in the public spaces on two levels, the exhibition includes original pieces on loan from the Foundation that range from ink sketches to watercolors to oils on canvas.

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Unconventional Diner’s Eric Eden Bringing The Ardent to Capitol Crossing

10/10/19 – Property Group Partners (PGP) announced today that Eric Eden, owner of Unconventional Diner, will bring The Ardent, a modern Mediterranean-style restaurant to Capitol Crossing. Unconventional Diner’s chef, David Deshaies, will work with Eden in opening the new restaurant. The Ardent will be located at 200 Massachusetts Avenue.

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WeWork Takes Three Floors at Capitol Crossing

05/09/19 — As part of its ever-expanding footprint in Washington, D.C., WeWork today announced its latest lease signing at Property Group Partners’ Capitol Crossing location at 200 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. WeWork will take three floors across the seventh, eighth and ninth stories and is expected to open their office space by year’s end. At 111,000-square feet, it will be one of WeWork’s largest office footprints in the District. WeWork joins the American Petroleum Institute (API), which moved in earlier this…

05/09/19 — As part of its ever-expanding footprint in Washington, D.C., WeWork today announced its latest lease signing at Property Group Partners’ Capitol Crossing location at 200 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. WeWork will take three floors across the seventh, eighth and ninth stories and is expected to open their office space by year’s end. At 111,000-square feet, it will be one of WeWork’s largest office footprints in the District. WeWork joins the American Petroleum Institute (API), which moved in earlier this year, at Capitol Crossing.

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Property Group Partners Honored with Developer of the Year Award

05/18/18 — Property Group Partners (PGP) is the recipient of the District of Columbia Building Industry Association’s (DCBIA) Developer of the Year award. PGP’s Jeffrey Sussman, Robert Braunohler and Sean Cahill represented PGP at DCBIA’s Annual Achievement Awards Dinner, which recognized PGP’s contributions to Washington D.C. through its work on Capitol Crossing and other projects in the District…

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Property Group Partners Signs Lease with American Petroleum Institute for Office Space at Capitol Crossing

10/03/17 — Property Group Partners (PGP) today announced that the American Petroleum Insitute (API) will be the first office tenant at Capitol Crossing – one of Washington, DC’s biggest and most ambitious new neighborhood destinations.

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Historic 1876 Adas Israel Synagogue Relocated for the Second Time in 140-Year History

11/03/16 — Today Washington’s oldest synagogue, the historic 1876 Adas Israel Synagogue, began a two-step relocation process to its new home at Third and F streets, NW, the second time it has moved in its 140-year history.

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Capitol Crossing Enters New Phase, Lays Foundation For Construction of New Neighborhood

02/17/16 — Capitol Crossing began installation of the project’s first steel beam Wednesday night laying the groundwork for reclaiming a neighborhood separated for over 40 years, announced developer Property Group Partners.

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Articles

CoStar Insights

Capitol Crossing Snags T. Rowe Price in Win for DC Office Project

01/22/21 – Expansion Deal Is Small but Potential Momentum Builder. T. Rowe Price is set to open a 20,000-square-foot office at 200 Massachusetts Ave. Roughly one month after announcing plans to relocate its Baltimore headquarters, T. Rowe Price Group is mapping out new office space on the other end of the Baltimore-Washington corridor.

Washington Business Journal

PGP Signs Another Big-Name Tenant at Capitol Crossing

01/12/21 – PGP has gained another tenant for its 200 Massachusetts Ave. NW, part of the larger Capitol Crossing development in downtown D.C. The firm, now in expansion mode, signed on for a partial-floor lease.

Washington Business Journal

Chef Johnny Spero To Open New Bar and Restaurant in D.C.’s East End

01/08/21 – Property Group Partners is adding a pair of food and drink options to the retail mix at Capitol Crossing, including a new bar and restaurant from Chef Johnny Spero and an Israeli-influenced bakery as it seeks to generate additional office leasing activity at the mixed-use project on D.C.’s East End. Bar Spero signed a lease in mid-December for about 7,000 square feet at 250 Massachusetts Ave. NW, about six months after Chef Tzurit Or’s Tatte Bakery & Cafe…

01/08/21 – Property Group Partners is adding a pair of food and drink options to the retail mix at Capitol Crossing, including a new bar and restaurant from Chef Johnny Spero and an Israeli-influenced bakery as it seeks to generate additional office leasing activity at the mixed-use project on D.C.’s East End.

Bar Spero signed a lease in mid-December for about 7,000 square feet at 250 Massachusetts Ave. NW, about six months after Chef Tzurit Or’s Tatte Bakery & Cafe leased around 4,000 square feet at the same address. They’re the first two retail leases in the roughly 560,000-square-foot building, which was the second to deliver as part of Property Group Partners’ 2.2 million-square-foot development atop the Interstate 395 Center Leg Freeway.

It wasn’t immediately clear what the menu or style of Bar Spero would be. We’ve reached out to the chef for more details and will update this post if we hear back.

Spero, who previously cooked at Komi and minibar, now owns Reverie, a high-end restaurant that he had been planning for years and opened in 2018. He just recently began running a pop-up pizza joint out of the semi-hidden Georgetown space, at least for the month of January, Eater reported.

PGP, represented by CBRE (NYSE: CBRE) Senior Vice President Kelly Silverman, has sought to put greater emphasis on local talent and notable names for the project’s retail space. That push included landing a Japanese food hall from famed Sushi Taro alum Makoto Okuwa and L’Ardent, a restaurant from Unconventional Diner’s Eric Eden, and it helped finish off retail leasing in the first building at 200 Massachusetts Ave.

David Happ, president of PGP Development, said the aim is to create a greater sense of place for the area around Capitol Crossing, which is more heavily dominated by a daytime population of office workers.

“Now we have four very, very high-quality tenants coming into the project,” Happ said. “The project was groundbreaking in that it went into a neighborhood that didn’t exist before, and now will have a neighborhood and retail vitality, and a livelihood after 5 p.m.”

The larger goal is to attract more office tenants to the development, which has been slower to take off than some expected. There are no office leases at 250 Massachusetts Ave. yet. Though, 200 Massachusetts Ave., spanning about 430,500 square feet, is around 70% leased with tenants including the American Petroleum Institute and WeWork. Smaller tenants in the building include the Portland Cement Association, the ESOP Association and law firm Ice Miller LLP. PGP has retained JLL brokers Doug Mueller and Evan Behr to oversee office leasing.

Happ said PGP was impressed with Or and her bakery, which is expanding into D.C. with new locations in Bethesda and in D.C., in the West End and near Dupont Circle. He felt Spero’s restaurant and bar concept would give office dwellers more after-hours options in the area.

“We wanted people to have a place to go and have a drink and a nice meal,” Happ said. “Also, Johnny Spero is out of Georgetown, and we know that they will do it right instead of walking into another formulaic restaurant.”

The feeling was mutual for Or, who first toured the site in 2018 and was impressed by the scale of PGP’s vision, she said, comparing it with walking through a small city given what’s expected from future phases of the project. She and Happ then met about a year later at her Harvard Square location in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to continue discussing a possible location at Capitol Crossing.

When it opens, that planned location at 250 Massachusetts Ave. will offer breakfast, lunch and dinner options, along with brunch Fridays through Sundays. The space will include Tatte’s full bakery menu and coffee bar program, with areas for guests to congregate around the main pastry counter and in a separate coffee bar.

In an email, Or described the plan for Capitol Crossing as a beautiful mix of buildings, with an opportunity for a bustling environment and location she wanted to join. “We wanted to be a part of it,” she said. “We wanted to bring an all-day gathering to the project.”

Washington Business Journal

WeWork, Capitol Crossing Owner Settle Lawsuit Over Tenant Buildout Costs

01/08/2021 – WeWork has settled a lawsuit it filed against its landlord at Capitol Crossing in which it alleged it was not reimbursed for costs incurred to build out its space at 200 Massachusetts Ave. NW. The coworking firm said it was owed nearly $13.6 million.

Chef Behind Unconventional Diner Will Open a Wood-Burning Mediterranean Place in 2020

10/11/19 – Unconventional spinoff: Fans of David Deshaies, the French chef who specializes in stepped-up American comfort food at Central and Unconventional Diner, will be happy to hear about his involvement in a new restaurant coming to the outer reaches of Mount Vernon Triangle late next year. Washington Business Journal reports that Deshaies and Unconventional Diner partner Eric Eden have signed the first retail lease at Capitol Crossing, the two-building development going up on Massachusetts Avenue NW over I-395. The…

10/11/19 – Unconventional spinoff: Fans of David Deshaies, the French chef who specializes in stepped-up American comfort food at Central and Unconventional Diner, will be happy to hear about his involvement in a new restaurant coming to the outer reaches of Mount Vernon Triangle late next year.

Washington Business Journal reports that Deshaies and Unconventional Diner partner Eric Eden have signed the first retail lease at Capitol Crossing, the two-building development going up on Massachusetts Avenue NW over I-395. The Ardent will take on a Mediterranean theme and take up 10,000 square feet in the building on 200 Massachusetts Avenue NW. According to Washington Post critic Tom Sietsema, who broke the news in his weekly chat, the restaurant will incorporate Italian, Spanish, and Southern French flavors with a wood-burning oven and grill churning out fish dishes and thin-crust sourdough pizzas.

Unconventional Diner won a local restaurant association RAMMY award this year for Upscale Brunch of the Year. Deshaies has drawn notice there for his double cheeseburger, his fried chicken, and more (sorry) unconventional dishes like Lebanese fried rice and eggs, confit lamb quesadillas, and a “French dip” pappardelle with wagyu beef, beech mushrooms, garlic chips, and horseradish cream.

Back in the spring, New York restaurateur and Shake Shack mogul Danny Meyer pulled out of a deal to put an offshoot of Union Square cafe in the Capitol Crossing development. Meyer will bring Italian seafood restaurant Maialino Mare to the Thompson Hotel in Navy Yard. [WBJ; WaPo]

Washington Business Journal

New restaurant from Unconventional Diner team coming to Capitol Crossing

10/10/19 – Capitol Crossing, the massive development being built over Interstate 395 in the District, has landed its first retail tenant. The Ardent, a Mediterranean restaurant, has signed a lease for 200 Massachusetts Ave. NW. That building was the first to deliver at Capitol Crossing, which when it’s finished will include 2.2 million square feet across five buildings. The 10,000-square-foot restaurant comes from Unconventional Diner owner Eric Eden and its chef, David Deshaies. The entrance to the restaurant will be…

10/10/19 – Capitol Crossing, the massive development being built over Interstate 395 in the District, has landed its first retail tenant.

The Ardent, a Mediterranean restaurant, has signed a lease for 200 Massachusetts Ave. NW. That building was the first to deliver at Capitol Crossing, which when it’s finished will include 2.2 million square feet across five buildings.

The 10,000-square-foot restaurant comes from Unconventional Diner owner Eric Eden and its chef, David Deshaies. The entrance to the restaurant will be off the pedestrian walkway between 200 and 250 Massachusetts Ave. NW, with the restaurant having visibility to Massachusetts Avenue in its location on the northwest corner of the building.

200 Massachusetts Ave. NW is already home to the American Petroleum Institute, which leased 75,000 square feet, and a WeWork, which has 111,000 square feet.

The next building to deliver at Capitol Crossing will be 250 Massachusetts. Development of the three additional buildings to the south will proceed in phases.

The project, from New York’s Property Group Partners, is one of the largest commercial real estate developments ever undertaken in the District. It involved constructing a platform over I-395 in order to reconnect the street grid between Capitol Hill and East End.

It has had some trouble lining up tenants for its retail space, however. New York restaurateur Danny Meyer was originally slated to open a location of Union Square Cafe and another, more casual outlet in the building, but he pulled out of that deal earlier this year. Food hall operator Politan Group is also working on a deal there, but we’re told that has also fallen through.

The Mediterranean menu at The Ardent will be cooked in part over a large-scale wood-burning oven and the design will include Murano glass chandeliers and a color scheme of “Mediterranean blues and sunset pinks,” according to the release. The restaurant will open in late 2020.

Washington Post

Ask Tom: Rants, Raves, and Questions on the DC Dining Scene

10/09/19 – Tom – Love your chat and have managed to make it to quite a few of the restaurants in over the last few years. However, we haven’t always agreed with your review (appreciate and read them all though). With some many good and new places in DC, for us to go back to a restaurant, requires a transcendent dish…

WeWork Inks 111K SF Lease At Capitol Crossing

05/09/19 – Property Group Partners has just secured a big lease to help fill the nearly 1M SF of office space it is delivering in the first two buildings at Capitol Crossing. The developer Thursday signed a 111K SF lease with WeWork at 200 Massachusetts Ave. NW, the latest deal in the coworking giant’s rapid expansion across the District. WeWork will take the seventh, eighth and ninth floors of the 414K SF building, which delivered last year. The coworking provider…

05/09/19 – Property Group Partners has just secured a big lease to help fill the nearly 1M SF of office space it is delivering in the first two buildings at Capitol Crossing.

The developer Thursday signed a 111K SF lease with WeWork at 200 Massachusetts Ave. NW, the latest deal in the coworking giant’s rapid expansion across the District.

WeWork will take the seventh, eighth and ninth floors of the 414K SF building, which delivered last year. The coworking provider expects to open its space later this year.

JLL’s Evan Behr, Doug Mueller and Nathan Beach represented PGP in the deal, and JLL’s Zach Boroson, Andy O’Brien and Greg Lubar represented WeWork.

The JLL team took over the leasing at Capitol Crossing from Cushman & Wakefield in July 2018. PGP President Jeffrey Sussman told Bisnow he wanted to bring in a new team after the initial leasing was slower than he had expected.

WeWork is the second office tenant to sign on at Capitol Crossing after the American Petroleum Institute inked a 75K SF deal in October 2017. On the retail front, Capitol Crossing had reached an agreement with restaurateur Danny Meyer to open a location of his popular New York City restaurant, Union Square Cafe, but Meyer pulled out of the deal last month.

The 250 Massachusetts Ave. NW building, expected to deliver this year, will add 559K SF of new office space to the Capitol Crossing. The five-building development is ultimately planned to include 1.9M SF of office space, 62K SF of retail and a 180K SF hotel, which had previously been planned as residential.

“The addition of WeWork to Capitol Crossing is a testament to the exceptional environment we are creating here,” PGP Senior Vice President David Happ said in a release.

The deal continues a string of major D.C. leases for WeWork as the coworking giant quickly expands its footprint in the region. Last month, WeWork signed on for 25K SF at 660 North Capitol St. NW, just three blocks from Capitol Crossing. It also signed a 110K SF lease last month at Midtown Center. In February, WeWork leased over 100K SF at 1701 Rhode Island Ave. NW, and it signed two deals in December for spaces in Mount Vernon Triangle and Dupont Circle.

“200 Massachusetts Avenue is a prime location to add to our growing portfolio in D.C.,” WeWork Mid-Atlantic General Manager Lex Miller said. “As our second-largest building and with such close proximity to Capitol Hill, we have a strong vision for how we will continue to build our unique amenities and product offerings that are attracting members in government affairs, trade associations and lobbying to WeWork.”

Urban Turf

From Luxury Hotels to Affordable Housing: The Development on Tap for Mount Vernon Triangle/Chinatown

05/23/18 — In our updated look at the status of the residential development pipeline in neighborhoods around the DC area, UrbanTurf heads to the Mount Vernon Triangle and Chinatown neighborhoods this week. In case you missed them, here are the other neighborhoods we have covered thus far: The 3,350 Residential Units Planned for Downtown Bethesda The 1,076 Units Delivering in NoMa This Year (And the Other 4,000 On the Boards) The 1,822 Units Planned for Tenleytown and AU Park The…

05/23/18 — In our updated look at the status of the residential development pipeline in neighborhoods around the DC area, UrbanTurf heads to the Mount Vernon Triangle and Chinatown neighborhoods this week.

In case you missed them, here are the other neighborhoods we have covered thus far:

The 3,350 Residential Units Planned for Downtown Bethesda
The 1,076 Units Delivering in NoMa This Year (And the Other 4,000 On the Boards)
The 1,822 Units Planned for Tenleytown and AU Park
The Over 4,700 Units On the Boards for Union Market
The 974 Units Slated for Shaw
437 Units and Creative Office Space: The Adams Morgan Development Rundown
The 825 Units Coming to the 14th Street Corridor
The 650 Units Headed for the H Street Corridor
The 2,480 Units in the Navy Yard Pipeline
The 3,120 Units Slated for South Capitol Street
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SLS Lux Hotel & Residences

Having secured zoning approvals and developed a plan to follow through on the affordable housing units required by that approval, construction is expected to begin on the SLS Lux Hotel & Residences in the coming months. Along with the Peebles Corporation, the development team includes SBE subsidiary Dakota Development, Walker Group and MacFarlane Partners; WDG Architecture is the designer.

Once completed at 901 5th Street NW (map), the project will deliver 175 hotel rooms across 7 floors and 48 condos on the top four floors. A José Andres restaurant is expected to be located on the ground floor, and amenities including a gym, spa and a 5,000 square-foot ballroom will be located on the cellar and mezzanine levels. There will also be a pool and terrace on the roof. A below-grade parking garage will accommodate 28 bicycles and 92 cars stacked over 46 spaces via a mechanized lift system.

Hotel guests will be provided with free Bikeshare passes and all condo buyers will receive a complimentary three-year membership to either a car- or bike-share program. Developer Peebles Corporation has agreed to build 31 affordable units on a site it owns in Anacostia; 30 additional units will also be required elsewhere. SLS Lux is anticipated to deliver in 2020.

WMATA Headquarters Redevelopment

WMATA’s headquarters at 600 5th Street NW (map) could potentially be up for a residential redevelopment once it is rezoned and (likely) sold. The agency has applied to rezone the site from D-2 to D-5-R to permit by-right residential or mixed-use development up to 120 feet tall (plus penthouse) and to subject any future development to inclusionary zoning regulations.

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The Canterbury

Developer Renaissance Centro was granted Historic Preservation Review Board approval last December for a new plan to retrofit The Harrison, one of DC’s oldest apartment buildings, into a larger hotel-apartment hybrid dubbed The Canterbury.

The project has been in the works at 704 3rd Street NW (map) for at least seven years and now is envisioned as a by-right project that would deliver nearly 200 hotel rooms and 65 apartments. The Gensler design appends a seven-story addition to a reconstructed version of the historic façades. A restaurant and bar fronting G Street will sit on the ground floor with patio space.

The rooftop will include a pool, bar/lounge, hotel terrace and a residential lounge and terrace. There will also be 39 parking spaces across two below-grade parking levels. Jonathan Nehmer and Associates handling the interior architecture.

As of now, it is unclear whether any zoning relief would be required; previous design iterations were approved by the Board of Zoning Adjustment (BZA) as early as 2012. Building permits to begin work on the site have not yet been applied for; previous extension requests for the site cited the ongoing construction of Capitol Crossing as determining the expected work schedule.

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The Cantata

Wilkes Company and Quadrangle have partnered with Mount Carmel Baptist Church to develop The Cantata at 801 3rd Street NW (map). The two-phase project, designed by SmithGroup JJR, will deliver a total of 351 residential units along with space for the church’s use. Twenty percent of the units will be set aside as affordable; amenities will include a gym and rooftop pool. It is unclear when construction will begin.

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Plaza West

Henson Development Company, Golden Rule Plaza and Mission First Housing Development Corporation have teamed up with the city to deliver an all-affordable development at 307 K Street NW (map).

Fifty of the units will be in a designated section of the building tailored to inter-generational “grandfamilies”, led by low-income grandparents raising their grandchildren. Amenities here will include a library, playroom and fitness room. Households earning less than 30 percent of AMI will occupy the remainder of the building. Additional amenities will include 9,500 square feet of outdoor space with a basketball court and garden; there will also be 51 below-grade parking spaces.

Lima Hotel

Developer Habte Sequar received zoning approval in February 2016 to develop a hotel/residential project on the former Henry’s Soul Cafe site at 317 K Street NW (map). Lima Hotel will be a 14-story building with 200 hotel rooms below 30 apartments. There will also be a 2,040 square-foot bar and 46 below-grade valet parking spaces. PGN Architects is the project architect.

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Capitol Vista

Groundbreaking is eminent for the Capitol Vista development on the 9,648 square-foot city-owned parking deck at New Jersey Avenue and Second and H Streets NW (map). The project will deliver 104 affordable units above 3,200 square feet of retail.

The unit mix will include 20 studios, 52 one-bedrooms and 32 two-bedrooms; 16 of the units will be for households earning up to 30 and 50 percent AMI and the remaining units will be for households earning up to 60 percent AMI. Amenities will include a game room, gym and rooftop terrace.

The triangular, Flatiron-inspired building is designed by Grimm + Parker Architects and is expected to deliver in 2020. Voltron Community Partners is the development team, comprised of Dantes Partners, Menkiti Group, Spectrum Management, and Bailey Real Estate Holdings.

Capitol Crossing

Property Group Partners is still at work on Capitol Crossing, the two million square-foot development slated for the air rights above the I-395 on-ramp at the intersections of Massachusetts Avenue, 2nd Street and E Street NW (map). While two of the office/retail buildings (and Danny Meyer’s first Union Square Cafe location outside of New York) are expected to deliver this year and next year, the residential portion is still on the horizon.

The whole development is expected to deliver in 2021 and the residential building will be designed by Beyer Blinder Belle and David Childs of SOM LLP. More detailed plans for the 180,000 square feet of residences are forthcoming.

U.S. Cities Can Save Billions with Green, Resilient Design, Says Report

02/18/18 — A financial case for green roofs, solar panels, and permeable pavement. Sustainability has become a buzzword for urban designers and environmental advocates. A new report released yesterday stresses that making it a de facto policy for U.S. cities would be a cost-effective design solution that could save millions, and even billions, of dollars. Co-authored by Greg Kats and Keith Glassbrook, Delivering Urban Resilience looked at the ecological and financial advantages that would come from promoting co-called “smart surfaces,”…

02/18/18 — A financial case for green roofs, solar panels, and permeable pavement.

Sustainability has become a buzzword for urban designers and environmental advocates. A new report released yesterday stresses that making it a de facto policy for U.S. cities would be a cost-effective design solution that could save millions, and even billions, of dollars.

Co-authored by Greg Kats and Keith Glassbrook, Delivering Urban Resilience looked at the ecological and financial advantages that would come from promoting co-called “smart surfaces,” such as as green roofs, solar panels, and permeable and porous pavement, in urban areas.

Using three different cities as case studies—El Paso, Texas, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.—the researchers examined how adding these features can lower excess heat and improve water quality and stormwater management, all costly environmental issues exacerbated by climate change. For the first time, researchers assembled an integrated cost-benefit analysis for these strategies using insight from city partners, epidemiologists, and tech and energy experts.

The results were promising, and suggest these adaptations should be seen less as a good idea and more as a necessary, and prudent, investment. The analysis showed that each of the cities studied would realize significant savings if they embraced these changes: El Paso would save $540 million, Washington, D.C., would save $1.8 billion, and Philadelphia would save $3.5 billion. These figures already factor in the cost of making significant adjustments and investments to add new, green infrastructure (the report puts the cost of a smart surface program in D.C. at $838 million, for example).

Adopting the entire suite of smart, resilient solutions would save cities significant money on energy, water, and infrastructure repairs, due to increased resilience. Cooling technologies and adaptions would cut regional energy bills and reduce smog, and the benefits to health and livability would compound over time.

The findings underlined the threat that climate change poses to urban areas, which, due to the heat island effect and rising temperatures, will suffer increasingly uncomfortable summers. The report notes that these changes, if adopted, would also prevent an expected loss of significant summer tourism revenue for the cities studies. Factoring in the tourism revenue that could be saved by these smart surfaces would revise the total savings estimates for both D.C. and Philadelphia to $4.9 billion and $8.4 billion, respectively.

“Climate change is already causing problems in communities in every region of our nation.”

The changes that come from city-wide adoption would also provide more proportional benefits to citizens living in low-income areas. Due to lack of trees and greenery, and the higher likelihood of living in or near areas covered in dark, impervious surfaces, these residents suffer more from summer heat, air pollution, respiratory illness, heat stress, and high health costs than the population at large. A previous study published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives found that, in U.S. cities, African Americans and Hispanics are 51 percent and 21 percent more likely, respectively, to live in high heat risk urban areas than non-Hispanic white Americans.

While energy savings are often seen as a significant benefit, mitigating rising temperatures can have a profound impact on health care costs. A 2017 report by the Medical Society Consortium on Climate & Health, representing 11 major medical societies such as the American Medical Association, found that “climate change is already causing problems in communities in every region of our nation.”

The report was released yesterday in Washington D.C. at Capitol Crossing, a new development seeking LEED certification. The researchers collaborated with 15 organizations, including the U.S. Green Building Council, American Institute of Architects, the National League of Cities, the National Housing Trust, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and The JPB Foundation.